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Ridiculously Simple Plugins on dev.life

Technical Blogs 26 de agosto de 2014 Por Olaf Kock Staff

This article accompanies the dev.life session "Ridiculously simple plugins" hosted today (26. Aug, 16:00 CEST, 14:00 UTC) by me. The session is broadcasted on youtube and recording will be available (and linked here) after the session.

The purpose of this session is to demonstrate that - given the proper architecture - you can extend Portal Applications within minutes. Well - the story is: Your developer estimates an hour (to do it properly), which means that you might want to round up to the next unit, e.g. 1 day - and this includes documentation, deployment, administration etc.

It's most likely harder to get your system administrator to update the production system yet again than to implement new functionality - given a proper architecture.

Quick start if you want to follow along:

Everything you need is available on www.olafkock.de/liferay/rsp/ and if you don't want to read through everything when we start, pick the instructions with the yellow markers below:

Customers project

During the session we're going to create 3 simple plugins. Two of them are extending a business layer that is generated with XMLPortletFactory. If you'd like, you can download & execute xmlportletfactory yourself with the customer&invoice definition file, but you can also use the shortcut and download this portlet project, unzip it in the portlets directory of your plugins sdk (yes, I'm using Ant, sorry Maveners) and open it in your development environment. For the session I'll use Liferay Developer Studio, but you're free to use whatever you'd like.

What does this project do? It's just what xmlportletfactory generates from the customer.xml script. Actually, I've cheated. It also contains a custom portlet as well that will provide some random data for you. However, it doesn't compile: Consider it to be just the xmlportletfactory output. To make it usable, you'll need to run Liferay's ServiceBuilder.

We'll explore the resulting code during this dev.life session. In short: Add all portlets from the new "Customer" section to a page, create a few customers and invoices and click the icon left of a customer to see the invoices updated.

If you examine the default xmlportletfactory-generated UI, it's not too obvious, which customer is currently selected. You can see it when the icon in a customer's row changes from a square to an arrow. Let's make the current customer more visible by hooking into the already established mechanism of Inter Portlet Communication. The first portlet we create is a CustomerDetailPortlet, showing the name and location of a customer. If we had more business data, we'd probably show more data in the details. (Solution to be linked after the session)

For the next portlet, assume you're using this system, with thousands of customers in the database. Whenever somebody calls, you'll have to search for them again. But when they're calling, they typically call multiple times, delivering more details for their issues. That's why we want to keep track of the latest 5 callers and we'll create a MostRecentlyUsedCustomerPortlet (MRU): This will make it easy to just click on their name, rather than searching for the record again. (Solution to be linked after the session)

What does this teach us? In a portlet environment you can easily compose your application from many different building blocks. If you introduce yet another portlet that interacts with the existing ones, it doesn't need to be big to add value. And it doesn't need to be high-risk to update the site: If your new portlet has a bug - just remove it again. The others will still continue to work, unaffected.

Here's the screenshot of what can be achieved within minutes: (Customer and Invoices Portlets are what xmlportletfactory generated)

Customizing Core Portlets vs. Adding ridiculously Simple Portlets

Time permitting, we'll have one more plugin that demonstrates how to simplify Liferay's UI through a ridiculously simple portlet. If you add WebContent, you'll find that the UI for adding a single article has quite a complex UI. You can translate, tag, expire, categorize your content, provide abstracts etc.

What if your authors are untrained, infrequent users of Liferay? Do you want to train them on the generic UI? They'll probably be annoyed because it's so complex and they don't need all of the features. So why not simplify the UI?

In the forums, this typically comes along as "How do I change the WebContent Editor (or other plugins) to use my defaults?". I'd like to suggest a different approach: Create your own, ridiculously simple plugin. It doesn't mess with Liferay's portlets, is easy to maintain and quick to write. And if the API that you use changes in the next version, you can easily identify the spot to upgrade. In fact, that's exactly what I did - I stole some code from James' 7cogs article and made it work on Liferay 6.2 because the API changed slightly.

So, we're creating a SimplifiedArticlePortlet, which takes an article's title, as well as english and german text through a really simple UI. Point your inexperienced authors to this portlet to add their new articles and you'll be able to take them from there (and you can edit them with the full-featured WebContent editor). Here's a screenshot of the result:

If you follow along (e.g. develop the portlets) during the session, this one is a bit harder to follow - after all it involves an API call with 39 parameters. That's why I've prepared the portlet for you to copy/paste portions as you like: http://www.olafkock.de/liferay/rsp/SimplifiedArticlePortlet.java and http://www.olafkock.de/liferay/rsp/SimplifiedArticlePortlet-view.jsp

What's more?

Given your own applications: Consider to make the best out of the portal environment and compose your big application from many small building blocks. The reward is an easy maintenance of each single component and easy extension of the whole system.

Liferay's API is easy to use (even given occasional 39-parameter methods) and sometimes it's a great option to just hardcode your own logic to a ridiculously simple plugin than to extend and tweak one of Liferay's very generic out-of-the-box portlets. There's a place for generic features, just as there's a place for specialized, narror, behaviour. Choose what makes sense to you and don't fear to write throwaway code: If it's well compartmented (e.g. in a single plugin) there's nothing bad in it.

Update

During the broadcast I didn't finish the MRUCustomerPortlet - here's what needs to be done. The code changes are marked in the solution download that will come up soon - portlet.xml is just updated as required, not marked:

  • Decorate the <li> content on view.jsp with a hyperlink that executes an action
  • Create an action handler in the portlet class, triggering the customerId event
  • Declare that our MRUCustomer portlet does also publish this event in portlet.xml
  • Declare that xmlportletfactory's CustomerPortlet now also processes this event in portlet.xml
  • Implement the eventhandler in CustomerPortlet to highlight the selected row.

And you're done. The full "solution" is now uploaded to customer-portlet-solution.zip.

Radio Liferay Episode 40: Our Upcoming Events. Hack 'em!

Company Blogs 19 de agosto de 2014 Por Olaf Kock Staff

  Radio Liferay is back with a repeat guest, James Falkner, Liferay's Community Manager. Like last year, symposium season is about to start (even though we already had some events earlier this year...). And there's something new, for the nerds and software craftsmen among you.

We talked about

  • The upcoming events, how to tell them apart and the target audience. In short: LPSF (Liferay Portal Solutions Forum) is targetted to business users, DevCon is targetted to Developers and technically interested people. Symposium has tracks for both groups.
  • You'll find almost all of the upcoming events on Liferay's Events overview - filter for "Conferences". As of publication of this episode, the first brazil symposium is not yet on that list.
  • Check if the event you want to go to still has an open Call For Paper. Some are still open the day that this episode is released.
  • Final reminder: Unconference seats will be limited. Register early to make sure you get your seat.
  • This year, we're going to provide access to the (anonymous) data that backs the events, and hope that you'll create an awesome mashup with this data. Refer to James' blog article "DIY: Liferay Events Hacks: Part 1" for details of the API and let us know if you need more help
  • iBeacons and what to do with them at events. (Watch out for a part 2 of James' blog article)
  • ...and other topics - but listen yourself... if you listen close enough, you might even hear a secret

Follow @RadioLiferay (James) or @olafk (me) on twitter

Again, shoutout and big thank you to Auphonic for postproduction help. This is a fantastic service!

You'll find this episode - and make sure that you don't miss any of the future episodes - by subscribing to  http://feeds.feedburner.com/RadioLiferay. You can also subscribe on itunes.: Just search for "Radio Liferay" or just "Liferay" in the podcast directory. If you like this, make sure to write a review for the podcast directory of your choice - or leave your feedback on www.liferay.com/radio.

Or just download the MP3 here:

download audio file

Radio Liferay Episode 39: Liferay Cloud Services

Company Blogs 14 de agosto de 2014 Por Olaf Kock Staff

 \o/ Radio Liferay is back. A while ago I talked with Juan Fernandez and Ivica Čardić about an exciting project they're collaborating on: Liferay Cloud Services. "What's this?" you ask? Well, good that you're asking, because here's the explanation. It's all about helping you monitor the health of your Liferay Installation, keeping an eye on the installed fixpacks (if you're using EE) or showing you some monitoring information that the server provides and you'd otherwise risk not to see.

(The episode is prefixed with a PSA for all Radio Liferay Listeners: The CfP for Devcon2014 is still open until 22. Aug 2014) and if you intend to come to the unconference on 4. Nov., make sure to register early: We have limited space and already predict that we'll sell out the unconference - there are enough seats available for the regular DevCon)

Juan is a project manager on this very project, working in Spain. Ivica is Senior Software Engineer, implementing LCS with the engineering team (Marko Čikoš and Igor Bešlić) in Croatia. I delayed publishing this episode to wait for the end of the private beta (you couldn't join anyway) until the public beta is just about to start.

We talked about

  • How LCS got started and what problems it solves (this is work in progress, designed for constantly added functionality)
  • (among the current information shown are things like: Performance metrics on JVM- and portal/portlet level, Fixpack information (EE only) and -installation.
  • The public beta is just around the corner (estimated in September). Test results from the private beta are in and lots of feature requests implemented (I can certify on that - some of them are mine)
  • Intended new features, to be added over time
  • New target audiences (currently it's largely system administrators, but content managers, e.g. for content targetting statistics, could be a possible future extension)
  • For the nerds, we talked about how LCS is implemented under the hood, and the mechanics of targetting Liferay 6.1 and 6.2 at the same time.
  • ...and others - but listen yourself...

Follow @RadioLiferay or @olafk (me) on twitter

Again, shoutout and big thank you to Auphonic for postproduction help. This is a fantastic service!

You'll find this episode - and make sure that you don't miss any of the future episodes - by subscribing to  http://feeds.feedburner.com/RadioLiferay. You can also subscribe on itunes.: Just search for "Radio Liferay" or just "Liferay" in the podcast directory.

Or just download the MP3 here:

download audio file

DevCon 2014 Call For Paper and Registration open. Unconference coming again

Company Blogs 8 de agosto de 2014 Por Olaf Kock Staff

It's public - Registration for DevCon 2014 (Wed-Thu, 5.-6. Nov) is open. And we're looking for your participation to make it an even bigger success. This year we're going to Darmstadt, just south of Frankfurt. The venue "Darmstadtium" is named after a chemical element that was named in honor of the city where it's first been created - it's one of those very heavy elements (atomic number 110) and predicted to behave like Platinum.

Platinum or at least Gold is what we'd like to see in your submissions: Check the Devcon homepage's Call For Papers for topics that we're looking for - but do submit even if your interesting topic doen't fit our list. (closing 22. Aug). Yes, it's short notice, so get up and submit quickly.

You'll notice that the Unconference (Tuesday, 4. Nov) will be held again. Like last year, space is limited, and it's expected to sell out quickly (the venue limits us - there's no way we can open up more space). If you want to be at the unconference it's wise to register early. The unconference is a spontaneously structured day where we focus on technical aspects of Liferay and you'll be able to bring in your topics.

If you're not lucky enough to get a seat at the unconference - or if you're more interested in the business aspects anyway - you might be interested in Liferay Portal Solutions Forum, which also takes place on Tuesday, 4. November, parallel to the unconference. Note that LPSF will be in german language. The two are distinctly different events and can't be interchanged at will (due to the space limitations)

Next, if you ever wanted to get highly condensed knowledge about Liferay, we're holding a "Mastering Liferay Fundamentals Express" Training on Monday, 3. Nov. This teaches the same topics as the original 2-day version of that training, with less exercises and higher density.

Find the combination that fits your needs best and book your event package. If you want to make sure to get a seat at the unconference: Register as soon as you can as space is limited - you have been warned.

We also will have another community meeting on 4. November. Stay tuned for more updates on that event. Note that - like last year - we'll require registration to hand out coupons for drinks (and to have an idea of how many of you will show up)

The Learning Curve, Chapter 4, Well hidden documentation

General Blogs 4 de agosto de 2014 Por Olaf Kock Staff

Are you new to Liferay? Found Liferay and want to know what it can do for you? Or are you with Liferay and still remember the time when you were new and unexperienced? Where did you come from and what was the biggest problem you faced? Can you ever learn enough? And how do you keep up with the current trends and new features?

A platform as big as Liferay spans several technologies and areas of best practices that are beneficial to know of. Nobody can know everything - there's always a learning curve. At the beginning, it's quite steep. Some argue that it's flattening the more you know. Some argue that it gets steeper: The more you know, the more you know what you don't know.

I'd like to give you pointers to resources that are available to you, in order to learn about Liferay, resources that help you avoid steep detours, when there are flatter direct connections. This is meant to be (eventually) comprehensive but I'm sure that it will never be complete. It's just what I remember while I write this article and the follow ups (yes, there are more, already drafted)

Today's Target Audience: mostly Developers, but some generic pointers for everybody.

After last week's call to read the official documentation, here's the documentation that you may easily miss

Javadoc (sic!)

Javadoc has not been Liferay's strength for a long time. The explanation for this is available in the end of Radio Liferay, Episode 21, but since then, a lot of Javadoc has been added to Liferay. It's available at docs.liferay.com, and growing. If you're wondering why some commonly used class is not documented there, you might also want to follow the master branch on github, as this gets all the latest and greatest javadoc (speaking of well hidden documentation). The API might not be 100% identical (this is the next version, after all) but as we add new features there, you'll find javadoc there first.

portal.properties

Did you ever extract Liferay's original portal.properties file? Or inspected it in the source code? This file has well over 10.000 lines in 6.2, and it's a wealth of information about Liferay. I do wholeheartly recommend to browse through it at least once. I personally have gotten a lot of ideas from this file about Liferay's extension points. There are some extension points that I only learned of because I've read that file. "Properties" you say, "what kind of reading enjoyment will that be?" Well: Look at it. Huge portions of that file are comments, describing the options you find, the preconditions as well as the features that you can configure here. Note: Some features are available only in portal.properties (or your overriding file portal-ext.properties) while others are available on the UI as well.

DTD and XSD

Have you developed plugins for Liferay and wondered about the possible configurations that you can add in the various xml files? Have you ever looked at the headers of those xml files? They do refer to a DTD or XSD file. Hands up if you know the peculiarities of DTD and XSD! ...

(I don't see any hands)

Well, try Liferay's definitions: Similar to portal.properties, you'll find a wealth of documentation right where you need it. I predict that you are able to make reasonable sense of most of Liferay's DTDs and XSDs, if only of the human readable comments. Your xml editor will help you make sense of the machine readable parts.

Care for some examples?

Or even more generic: Try http://docs.liferay.com/portal/6.2/. If you're on older versions, go further to the root directory (It's worth exploring that site)

Presentations

You might know that Liferay hosts quite a lot of events around the world. Even though it's impossible to attend every single event, you should keep an eye on them and on the presentations that are available there. For one, they might spark your ideas, when you just look at the presentations. If you've been there, you might remember everything, when you read the slides again. And for some events there are even recorded presentations. E.g. here is DevCon 2013.

Which brings me to point to a presentation that never aired on Radio Liferay (despite being scheduled as such) because the pure audio recording didn't come out and the video had a bit too much room noise to extract the audio IMHO. I'll refer to it as "the hidden Radio Liferay Episode" from now on, here it is for your viewing pleasure. It's short, less than 18 minutes.

And if you're not yet on Liferay 6.2, you might be interested in the literal "Well Hidden Features" episode

Speaking of which: Devcon 2014 registration just opened, including the Call For Papers. You can be part of this year's event and add to this chapter. Events like this (depending on where you are: North American Symposium and various others around the world - there are rumors for more to come) really give you a lot of insider information and insight.

(more about Devcon in another upcoming blog post)

Even better hidden?

When I woke up this morning, I was thinking of a great resource - but forgot which one it was. Obviously it's quite well hidden. If it comes back, I'll make a note and add it to one of the next posts. Unfortunately, that's the nature of these well hidden items. If you have your own favorite hidden documentation: Please add it in the comments. Oh, and: There's another well hidden place that is so well hidden, that I'll better not yet speak about it. Keep your eyes open and subscribe to the blogs - you'll probably get it here first.

Also, let me sneak something in, which is clearly linked on this site, but not as documentation: If you rather learn hands-on, you might want to consider one of the certified Liferay Trainings - There's a course for almost any role that you can have in Liferay: Content Provider, Developer, System Administrator, Business Owner - you name it, we have it. Not only do you get a lot of structured knowledge, you'll also have the chance to get your questions answered by an experienced Trainer.

While Training is not documentation, it can definitely help to flatten the learning curve.

Next up?

Stay tuned for Chapter 5: Community Resources (please let me know your favorite recommendations)

The Learning Curve, Chapter 3 - Documentation (sic!)

General Blogs 28 de julio de 2014 Por Olaf Kock Staff

Are you new to Liferay? Found Liferay and want to know what it can do for you? Or are you with Liferay and still remember the time when you were new and unexperienced? Where did you come from and what was the biggest problem you faced? Can you ever learn enough? And how do you keep up with the current trends and new features?

A platform as big as Liferay spans several technologies and areas of best practices that are beneficial to know of. Nobody can know everything - there's always a learning curve. At the beginning, it's quite steep. Some argue that it's flattening the more you know. Some argue that it gets steeper: The more you know, the more you know what you don't know.

I'd like to give you pointers to resources that are available to you, in order to learn about Liferay, resources that help you avoid steep detours, when there are flatter direct connections. This is meant to be (eventually) comprehensive but I'm sure that it will never be complete. It's just what I remember while I write this article and the follow ups (yes, there are more, already drafted)

Today's Target Audience: All (unless more specifically indicated in the individual paragraphs below)

There's a good argument that this chapter should have been the first. However, just saying "RTFM" is guaranteed to give the least amount of attention possible. So I postponed the obvious until chapter 5. Is it really obvious? Let's check.

User Guide

Have you ever read Liferay's User Guide? Whatever you answer, my prediction is that you don't know what's in there today - if only because it's constantly updated. As a regular user of Liferay, no matter what your role is, you probably need to know several of the chapters outlined in that guide. It's covering anything from Content- and User-Management, Installation, Dealing with Plugins etc.

It's worth checking it out, even if you have some experience developing with Liferay. After all: When you know about a feature being available in Liferay, you can just use it instead of implementing it yourself. Every built in feature that you use, you don't have to write & maintain yourself. Remember that story from chapter 1 - the training participants that only took Mastering Liferay fundamentals training years after their project started? Same reasons here.

If you're missing content or want to suggest/provide improvements, you can do so on Jira. If you're technically savvy, you might want to follow the evolution of this guide on github or contribute.

Developer's Guide

Next to the User Guide you'll find the Developer Guide. Similar to the User Guide, this document is a living one and gets updated from time to time. If you have read it already, you might want to check back if it has been extended since that time. Even if you believe that you should know it by now: There are many gems that you might have missed the first time you read it. (I am constantly learning new tricks in Liferay, especially when going through well known material again)

Of course, you can also follow the Developer's Guide evolution on github and contribute through pull requests or issues, just like with the User Guide.

Books

I'll have to admit, it's been a while since I last read books about Liferay. Among the ones that I read, there were some that I liked and some that didn't really match my expectations... As it's been a while (a few versions ago), only one recommendation is left: Liferay in Action, though based on version 6.0, still contains very relevant content.

Sorry to not be able to point you to new books. If you want to recommend in the comments, please do so. Also indicate any relationship to the author or why you particularly liked the book - please don't just mention that there is a book.

Wiki

I'd like to mention our Wiki here. For one, you might find it as search results in case you're looking for information. It has quite good information, but you'll have to be aware that it's sometimes severely outdated. Double check the history of the articles: If it hasn't been touched for a few years or mentions Liferay versions 4.x, use it with a grain of salt - more to this in a later chapter about community resources.

Next up?

Stay tuned for Chapter 4 - Next week: Well hidden documentation (for developers), covering documentation that is available, but arguably harder to find than clicking on the "Documentation" link or searching for "Liferay" on Amazon.

Call For Feedback and Suggestions

For chapter 5 or 6 I'm planning to cover Community Resources. You might have your favorite go-to place that I haven't found yet. If you want to make sure that your favourite resource gets mentioned: Give me a hint.

The Learning Curve, Chapter 2 - Infrastructure

General Blogs 21 de julio de 2014 Por Olaf Kock Staff

Are you new to Liferay? Found Liferay and want to know what it can do for you? Or are you with Liferay and still remember the time when you were new and unexperienced? Where did you come from and what was the biggest problem you faced? Can you ever learn enough? And how do you keep up with the current trends and new features?

A platform as big as Liferay spans several technologies and areas of best practices that are beneficial to know of. Nobody can know everything - there's always a learning curve. At the beginning, it's quite steep. Some argue that it's flattening the more you know. Some argue that it gets steeper: The more you know, the more you know what you don't know.

I'd like to give you pointers to resources that are available to you, in order to learn about Liferay, resources that help you avoid steep detours, when there are flatter direct connections. This is meant to be (eventually) comprehensive but I'm sure that it will never be complete. It's just what I remember while I write this article and the follow ups (yes, there are more, already drafted)

Today's Target Audience: Technical (Sysadmins and Developers), unless indicated otherwise:

Basic Understanding

Liferay is always running in some kind of environment. It requires a database to store its data. It requires an application server to run on. And there are a lot more component that you can operate in combination with Liferay: Single-Sign-On, LDAP, Search Appliances, Monitoring Systems etc. Let's look at the most common ones and keep the other ones for later:

Liferay's User Guide has several chapters on Administration and Installation. While this gives you the necessary step-by-step instructions to get started on any (supported) platform, the more experience you have on a platform, the more you can get your own policy or opinion into the game.

Application Server

Liferay is an application that requires a container to run in. This can be a simple servlet container or a full blown application server. Naturally, quite a bit of configuration for Liferay depends on the container that you're running on. And, as technical staff, you should know a bit about your container of choice and about Java Web applications in general. For the purpose of this blog post, I'm summarizing all these containers as "Application Servers" even if they might be more simple than you'd expect from such a component.

Among the things that you should know (or learn) about your application server of choice are

  • Proper setup for production, including hardening, protecting default management interfaces from public access
  • Update procedures. Even (or especially) if you're running Liferay from a bundle: The maintenance of the appserver is in your realm.
  • Backup and (Disaster) Recovery.

Where do you find that information and experience? The vendor (or supporting website) of your appserver vendor should have it, alternatively somebody in your team or on the market: Having a good system administrator or developers with good understanding of the platform they're developing on is gold. There's trainings for the server of your choice, books, and the internet is full of Q&A. If you wonder why there's no link here: Liferay supports various versions of the following application servers, and I'm familiar with only few of them:

  • Glassfish
  • JBoss
  • Tcat
  • tcServer
  • Tomcat
  • Weblogic
  • WebSphere
  • Resin

Speaking about your Application server of choice: Which one should you choose? The bulletpoints above might already answer this question: Choose the one that you feel most familiar with. If I give my recommendation (the one I'm most familiar with), this doesn't help you: you might not have a clue about hardening, maintenance, backup and recovery of that platform. So check your team's experience with and make your own choice. Ask your team about the best way to learn about their preferred platform. Mentor each other. Find local usergroups, online resources and meetups/conferences for the platform of your choice. (this exercise is left for the reader. If you have outstanding, specific preferred resources, feel free to add them as comment)

Database

The same goes for your database: Liferay supports many of the databases available on the market. While it will be happy to store its data in your DB, the setup, backup, maintenance and tuning of that database is totally outside the realm of Liferay. Where do you get the experience? With the vendor or platform of your choice. Here we have the same recommendation as with appserver: Choose the one platform that you can maintain best. It's not worth choosing my favourite one just because it's 5% faster when you have no clue about its backup strategy or disaster recovery.

Again - where do you find this information? With the database vendor of your choice. From Q&A sites. From training and from experienced admins that you're working with. (and again: Feel free to add outstanding resources as comments)

For databases, just like for application servers, you'll have to make your own choice: Here are the databases that Liferay supports (in various versions)

  • DB2
  • MySQL
  • Oracle
  • Postgresql
  • SQL Server
  • Sybase ASE

Installation/Maintenance Training

Naturally, with Liferay's Training offerings, "there's a course for that": In Administering Liferay Systems, we spend 3 full days to set up, maintain and tune Liferay within the infrastructure. While this course concentrates on the open source appservers and databases (because that's what we can legally distribute for the class), you're free to bring your own appservers and databases and try out the principles that you learn in this class.

Target Audience for this class, naturally: System Administrators and DevOps.

As always, this course is available in public trainings, scheduled around the world, as well as onsite, with a trainer coming to your organization.

Links?

So much for the infrastructure. Granted, due to the nature of these recommendations there are not a lot of clickable links here. Help me fix this and add your recommendations for the environment of your choice in the comments. And stay tuned for Chapter 3: Documentation (sic!).

People that liked this article, also liked The Learning Curve Chapter 1 - a basic overview.
People that like to learn more about what happens behind the scenes, also like to listen to Radio Liferay. ;)

The Learning Curve, Chapter 1 - A basic overview

General Blogs 15 de julio de 2014 Por Olaf Kock Staff

Are you new to Liferay? Found Liferay and want to know what it can do for you? Or are you with Liferay and still remember the time when you were new and unexperienced? Where did you come from and what was the biggest problem you faced? Can you ever learn enough? And how do you keep up with the current trends and new features?

A platform as big as Liferay spans several technologies and areas of best practices that are beneficial to know of. Nobody can know everything - there's always a learning curve. At the beginning, it's quite steep. Some argue that it's flattening the more you know. Some argue that it gets steeper: The more you know, the more you know what you don't know.

I'd like to give you pointers to resources that are available to you, in order to learn about Liferay, resources that help you avoid steep detours, when there are flatter direct connections. This is meant to be (eventually) comprehensive but I'm sure that it will never be complete. It's just what I remember while I write this article and the follow ups (yes, there are more, already drafted)

Today's Target Audience: All, this is providing an overview and basic information

Quick reads

A very quick overview over the aspects of the Liferay Platform are the Whitepapers found in the "Business Whitepapers" section. I recommend them even for technically oriented folks, as they show off some aspects that you otherwise wouldn't necessary get in contact with, and they're really quick to read.

Continuing on the quick reads, you might be interested in case studies, e.g. matching your industry, your usecase or your location. All of them are easy to filter.

Events





To get in contact with people that are actually using Liferay, a good opportunity is to visit the events that are happening all over the world. Starting with half-day roadshows that are conducted in cooperation with our service partners. These typically feature some customer case study and - most important - bring you face to face with experienced Liferay-, Partner- and Customer-Staff. You'll get real experience & answers to the questions that you bring.

On with other events: All over the world, you'll find either "Symposiums" or "Liferay Portal Solutions Forum" or LPSF. These are typically single- or two-day events. Some are in the language local to the country they take place in, others are in english, or mixed. About the content, LPSF is focussing on the business aspect of Liferay. You'll typically find customer case studies, insights into Liferay's Roadmap and our "Speed consulting", where an experienced Consultant answers as many questions as you can ask during your appointed time slot. In contrast, Symposiums add the technical crowd to the mix. The different target audiences are organized in different tracks, but there's some overlap and you can choose from session to session. Purely technical people are the target audience for DevCon

Trainings

Mastering Liferay FundamentalsLiferay offers different certified courses for all target audiences - how about getting you or your project team kickstarted with Mastering Liferay Fundamentals? This course gives you a comprehensive overview over Liferay Features. After having taken this course, you have a solid impression of Liferay's feature set, the configurability and how to adapt this great platform for your own site(s). Our trainers are well experienced, so you'll be able to get your own questions answered during class, in addition to the curriculum.

For the managers and business owners: You'll learn what Liferay can do for you.

For the developers and technical people: You'll learn that Liferay has many features that you just need to enable or tweak, rather than implementing them yourself, from ground up.

A customer once stated to me that they'd have saved months of implementation if their developers only had taken this class at the beginning of their implementation, rather than a few years in.

Trainings are offered on-site (a good deal for 5 and more participants from your organization: Have the trainer come to your place) or as public trainings, open for anybody to sign up. "Mastering Liferay Fundamentals" is also available online. For all Liferay trainings, you can get a certification of participation as well as a badge on your liferay.com profile (check out mine)

So much for the basic overview, stay tuned for Chapter 2: The infrastructure Liferay is running in, and what you should know about it.

Community Meeting: Wien, 15. Mai

General Blogs 9 de mayo de 2014 Por Olaf Kock Staff

(english summary below)

Liferay öffnet am 15. Mai offiziell sein österreichisches Büro - ein schöner Anlass, am Abend zum Community-Meeting einzuladen:

15. Mai 2014, 19:30 (Achtung: Neue Zeit!)
Eatalico
Praterstraße 31
1020 Wien

Auf der Agenda steht: Zwangloser Gedankenaustausch, Treffen mit anderen Liferay-Nutzern und ich (sowie andere) werde bereitstehen, Fragen zu beantworten.

Wie immer bitte ich um Bestätigung, damit wir einschätzen können, was für einen Tisch wir reservieren müssen. An-/Rückmeldung per Kommentar hier, via Twitter oder per Mail (olaf punkt kock ät liferay punkt com).


What better reason to have a community meeting than Liferay opening its austrian office. You're welcome to join even if you don't speak german. Please let us know if you're planning to come - via comment here, tweet to @olafk or mail to me, olaf (dot) kock at liferay.com.

Community Meeting: Zurich, 7. Mai

General Blogs 22 de abril de 2014 Por Olaf Kock Staff

Location Update:
Zunfthaus zur Haue, Limmatquai 52, 8001 Zürich
Mittwoch, 7. Mai 2014, 19:00
Ich bitte um Rückmeldung, um ausreichend Tische zu reservieren!

(english summary below)

Und wieder bin ich auf Reisen, dieses Mal zu den Trainings "Mastering Liferay Fundamentals" und "Developing for the Liferay Platform 1" in Zürich/Schweiz. (Hint: Es gibt noch freie Plätze).

Aus diesem Anlass - und weil es immer wieder nett ist, einen Abend mit Gleichgesinnten zu verbringen, rufe ich mal wieder zum Community-Meeting auf für Mittwoch, 7. Mai, 19:00. Wie gewohnt wird der exakte Ort kurzfristig bekannt gegeben - es wird in der Nähe des Hauptbahnhofs sein und ich nehme gern Empfehlungen an. Um eine Tischreservierung vornehmen zu können, bitte ich um An-/Rückmeldung per Kommentar hier, via Twitter-Mention oder per Mail (olaf punkt kock ät liferay punkt com).

Wer sich nicht anmeldet und dadurch keinen Sitzplatz mehr bekommt, sitzt zwischen den Stühlen ;)


Again, calling for a community meeting. This time in Zürich/Switzerland (note: seats in trainings are still available). This post will be updated with the exact location a day before the event. It will be Wednesday, 7. May, at 19:00 (7pm), close to the main station. Please register by commenting here or through a twitter mention to make sure the table has enough room (and beer) for everyone.

Community Meeting: Stuttgart (15. April 2014)

General Blogs 7 de abril de 2014 Por Olaf Kock Staff

(english summary below)

Hallo zusammen,

ich bin mal wieder auf Reisen - genauer gesagt beim Training "Administering Liferay Systems" in Stuttgart (Hint: es gibt noch freie Plätze) und habe am Dienstag, 15. April, abend noch nichts vor. Korrektur: Jetzt habe ich etwas vor!

Ich rufe kurzfristig zum Community-Meeting im Café Kaiserbau am Marienplatz in Stuttgart auf, zum freundlichen Gespräch und Austausch bei Bier, Wein oder einem anderen Getränk. Um einen groben Überblick zu haben und einen passenden Tisch zu reservieren, bitte ich um kurze Rückmeldung per Kommentar hier, auf twitter oder per Mail (olaf punkt kock ät liferay punkt com)

Keine Agenda, keine Vorträge (sofern sich nicht jemand aufdrängt), nur nette Unterhaltung. Start: 18:30 Uhr, die genaue Location gebe ich spätestens am Tag vorher hier bekannt (Vorschläge von Ortskundigen sind gern genommen) steht jetzt oben: Cafe Kaiserbau. Ich habe einen Tisch bestellt - bitte probiert entweder "Liferay" oder meinen Namen, wenn ich noch nicht da bin.


the promised english summary

As I'll be in Stuttgart for the upcoming training "Administering Liferay Systems" (which you still can register for), I'm calling for a community meeting. The location will be close to Marienplatz, Time is Tuesday, 15. April 2014, 18:30 (6:30 pm). To ensure we have enough seats, please register by commenting here, on twitter or through mail (olaf dot kock fancy-symbol liferay dot com, go figure). There's no agenda or presentation (unless someone volunteers), just conversation (and some drinks). Location: Cafe Kaiserbau, there's a table for "Liferay" or on my name.

Radio Liferay Episode 38: Alberto Chaparro on the Migration tool for Portlets Version 6.1 to 6.2

General Blogs 5 de febrero de 2014 Por Olaf Kock Staff

 I talked with Alberto Chaparro. Alberto works for Liferay as a support engineer on the spanish team. This conversation follows up on something that Iliyan mentioned in episode 37: The migration tool that will help you upgrade your portlet from 6.1 to 6.2. We're talking during the end of the symposium, so the background noise that you hear are people that are starting to break down the staff room.

We talked about

  • Alberto has helped Iliyan working on the upgrade tool that we spoke about in episode 37
  • The tool helps upgrading AlloyUI JS, CSS and some JSP code from Liferay 6.1 to 6.2
  • Alberto presented this tool at the spanish symposium
  • The tool is available for Windows, Mac and Linux, Installation instructions are available in the tool / github repository
  • It's been used on 100+ portlet plugins already, providing good service in the upgrade process. Sorry, this is the only plugin type that it's good for.

Follow RadioLiferay or me on twitter

Again, shoutout and big thank you to Auphonic for postproduction help. This is a fantastic service!

You'll find this episode - and make sure that you don't miss any of the future episodes - by subscribing to  http://feeds.feedburner.com/RadioLiferay. You can also subscribe on itunes.: Just search for "Radio Liferay" or just "Liferay" in the podcast directory.

Or just download the MP3 here:

download audio file

Radio Liferay Episode 37: Iliyan Peychev on Frontend and AlloyUI

General Blogs 9 de enero de 2014 Por Olaf Kock Staff

 I talked with Iliyan Peychev, Software Developer from Madrid. We met during Liferay's spanish symposium (so it's about time to publish the episode - sorry for the delay). We're back on Liferay's frontend, so I'm getting my scoop on how to approach Javascript work, new tools, new infrastructure. Also - as you'll discover - I got a glimpse of developer-paradise

We talked about

  • where Iliyan's non-spanish accent comes from
  • Iliyan is a long time user and contributor to YUI (since YUI 2.x) and came on board when Liferay was looking for an Ajax Developer after having seen many of the AlloyUI components.
  • Liferay's currently open positions (changed since we recorded, but still a lot & interesting positions)
  • How to approach AlloyUI, what tools to use
  • as 6.2 uses Bootstrap for themes, we talk about the migration of existing themes and the way we work with css. (the episode has been recorded just before the actual release of 6.2)
  • The Liferay AUI upgrade tool will cover a lot of the upgrade work you need to do to migrate your existing 6.1 plugins to 6.2 - covering various API upgrades etc. (see https://github.com/liferay/liferay-aui-upgrade-tool#what-it-does - doesn't it sound like paradise?)
  • AlloyUI now has a testing infrastructure - automatically running a on a huge number of browsers to make sure nobody introduces regressions with a change to AlloyUI
  • Roadmap for AlloyUI past 2.0
  • Just like all Open Source projects, AlloyUI lives and improves on feedback - please help and get involved, get your impression heard. (and the same goes to podcasts. Please let me know which episodes you like, what to change, topic requests. You have blog comments to this episode on liferay.com, itunes comments and ratings and other platforms - whereever you get this podcast from)
  • The AlloyUI team hangs out on Forums, IRC, stackoverflow, twitter, github, jira - use whatever suits you best.
  • An alternative to Bootstrap that has been considered
  • Though symposium season is over now, you, dear listener, might consider to come to one of the 2014 Symposiums, Portal Solution Forums, Roadshows or DevCon.
  • AlloyUI is available through CDN

Follow Iliyan, RadioLiferay or me on twitter

Again, shoutout and big thank you to Auphonic for postproduction help. This is a fantastic service!

You'll find this episode - and make sure that you don't miss any of the future episodes - by subscribing to  http://feeds.feedburner.com/RadioLiferay. You can also subscribe on itunes.: Just search for "Radio Liferay" or just "Liferay" in the podcast directory.

Or just download the MP3 here:

download audio file

Radio Liferay Episode 36: Daniel Sanz on Liferay Translations

General Blogs 18 de noviembre de 2013 Por Olaf Kock Staff

  For this episode I spoke with Daniel Sanz. He's a support engineer in the spanish office and is responsible to oversee the translation efforts on Liferay.

We talked about

  • He's the one to keep the pootle instance at translate.liferay.com populated and synchronize changes between pootle and the git repository. This started with some script by Milan Jaros
  • Liferay has some generated translations (with the help of babelfish or bing translate) as well as some copied (english) texts in all the localizations. This needs to be handled, so that pootle does know which (existing) translation still requires manual work.
  • the process of synchronization between pootle and git requires some patches and bugfixes in pootle - an open source, python based product.
  • More complication added by maintaining different branches of Liferay, different plugins (not only portal) and different sources of translations (git, pootle, Jenkins, other contributions).
  • it's hard to keep 100% completion for a translation as new features are constantly added
  • Due to the scripting work, translation can be done either in git or in pootle.
  • Liferay provides translations to roughly 42 (sic!) languages.
  • Shoutout to Daniel Reuther, who has worked hard on the german translation, standing in for me because my vacation came just at the right time - thanks Daniel.
  • History of translations and automatic translations (starting with Yahoo's babelfish, continuing with Bing translator) and if they make sense... (hint: no, with an exception mentioned at the end)
  • \o/ : The pootle import scripts ignore automatic translations. They only appear on the UI when they continue to not be translated.
  • We're evaluating to use other tools than pootle - however, the existing bidirectional scripting makes it hard to choose something different (even updating pootle can be hard)
  • Become part of the Translation Team and communicate on the Translation Forum

Follow RadioLiferay or me on twitter

Again, shoutout and big thank you to Auphonic for postproduction help. This is a fantastic service!

You'll find this episode - and make sure that you don't miss any of the future episodes - by subscribing to  http://feeds.feedburner.com/RadioLiferay. You can also subscribe on itunes.: Just search for "Radio Liferay" or just "Liferay" in the podcast directory.

download audio file

Radio Liferay Episode 35: Greg Amerson and David Truong on Developer Tooling

General Blogs 13 de noviembre de 2013 Por Olaf Kock Staff

  At Devcon 2013 I've met with Greg Amerson, main Author/Team Lead for the Eclipse-based tooling (Liferay IDE & DevStudio) and David Truong, one of the very early employees of Liferay, Product Manager for Platform an Tooling. The topics we covered were all around Developer Tooling. There's a bit of background noise as we were recording this session in the break area of the conference. We had to limit ourselves to the time when some sessions were on, in order to find the quietest possible environment.

We talked about

  • Ray, a very new command line project that has been shown and discussed at DevCon, aiming to bring the ease of Application Development of Rails, Play Framework, Grails etc. to Liferay.
  • Ray is obviously a very new prototype, designed to rather gather feedback than to demonstrate a ready-for-use environment.
  • Ray will be Development-platform-agnostic, e.g. not tied to our eclipse-based developer offering. It's (currently) maven based, built on top of Spring Roo
  • Play with Ray and give feedback: Fork or Clone Greg's github version, the release will take at least half a year, but you now can influence what it will be able to do for you in future.
  • Ray is aiming to be cross-version compatible, due to this aim, the release plan will be completely independent on Liferay Portal's.
  • Liferay IDE 2.0 finally supports Maven, check the latest Milestone if the final version is not yet out.
  • Greg needs feedback (link forums) on typical Liferay-Maven-project structures to continue work on the maven integration
  • IDE 2.0 is scheduled to be out two weeks after Liferay Portal's GA for 6.2, but the Milestones are supposed to be stable. New features for 2.0: Maven, Freemarker-Debugger (for Themes in M1, for ADT in M2), new Project Wizard with support for more than the SDK
  • Underlying Topic in this episode: Feedback is key - if you give feedback early, you can bring your favorite things in.
  • IDE Roadmap: Tools that work across different environments - e.g. commandline tools like Ray, IntelliJ Idea, Netbeans or others.
  • Greg's move to china that we discussed back in Episode 15 and how to say "cheese" in mandarin.

Follow David, Greg, RadioLiferay or me on twitter

Again, shoutout and big thank you to Auphonic for postproduction help. This is a fantastic service!

You'll find this episode - and make sure that you don't miss any of the future episodes - by subscribing to  http://feeds.feedburner.com/RadioLiferay. You can also subscribe on itunes.: Just search for "Radio Liferay" or just "Liferay" in the podcast directory.

download audio file

Radio Liferay Episode 34: Ray Auge, Miguel Pastor on Modularity and OSGi

General Blogs 28 de octubre de 2013 Por Olaf Kock Staff

 At Devcon 2013 I met with Miguel Pastor and Ray Auge, both Engineers and Core Developers at Liferay. They both have been involved in the latest modularization efforts, resulting in OSGi being now on the Feature List for Liferay 6.2.

We recorded this session in the break area of the conference, during one of the sessions in order to find some quiet time. Unfortunately, as you'll hear in this recording, we picked the time when Lunch was prepared, so the catering staff is setting up stacks of plates, heaps of cutlery and other noisy stuff. This episode might be the one with the most background noise we ever had on this podcast, but after all, it's in the background and I hope it doesn't distract too much. Be assured, the lunch was really nice.

With the main topics being OSGi and Modularity, we talked about:

  • Middleware and Appservers that support OSGi
  • 6.2 is the first release to officially be supporting OSGi
  • Goal is to shrink Liferay's footprint
  • The current state of OSGi in Liferay - is there anything left to do? (guess what - the answer is "yes")
  • Extending Liferay with plugins without depending on the Appserver. Liferay can be extended through plugins in an Appserver - in future this should be a lot easier just extending with OSGi bundles. The current mechanism is extremely dependent on the Appserver we're running on.
  • Deploying an OSGi plugin to Liferay completely decouples Liferay from the mechanisms of the Appserver,
  • What will happen to the existing plugin types - namely "ext"?
  • OSGi will make a difference for plugins that extend plugins - this works today, but is not straightforward.
  • This way of modularization will help lowering the learning curve for developing plugins - making extensions easier to write with the classic Java knowledge background.
  • Feature Bleed and Interdependencies between different unrelated parts of Liferay - as they exist today and will hopefully change in future

Follow Ray, Miguel, RadioLiferay or me on twitter

Again, shoutout and big thank you to Auphonic for postproduction help. This is a fantastic service!

You'll find this episode - and make sure that you don't miss any of the future episodes - by subscribing to  http://feeds.feedburner.com/RadioLiferay. You can also subscribe on itunes.: Just search for "Radio Liferay" or just "Liferay" in the podcast directory.

download audio file

Radio Liferay Episode 33: Jari Järvelä, Janne Hietala on Valamis

General Blogs 24 de septiembre de 2013 Por Olaf Kock Staff

 About a month ago I had the opportunity to talk to Jari Järvelä and Janne Hietala from Arcusys. They both head Valamis, an E-Learning solution on Liferay that later (end-of-August) won the Liferay App Contest. Unfortunately, a lot of work as well as my summer vacation kept me from releasing this podcast earlier (well, for me it was not quite unfortunate that I had a vacation)

Here are our topics:

  • the history of name changes, starting with "JSCORM"
  • The meaning and origin of the name
  • The release schedule (they met the schedule that we discussed during the recording, released end-of-August)
  • Features that have been added throughout the history of the project.
  • The version released in August now has a Curriculum Portlet that combines different courses into a Learning Path.
  • SCORM, the prevalent standard for exchanging E-Learning information. This standard is typically used as distribution format for commercial courses and Valamis supports SCORM 1.2.
  • We talked about Liferay Certification being available "soon" - that was true at the time when we recorded the podcast, it's actually available now
  • License, Availability and Price (hint: LGPL, and there's professional support available)
  • There's a steady team working full-time on Valamis.
  • Design aspects: The Arcusys Team really cares about design aspects, both in the software, as well as in their presentations.
  • Geography for beginners, we talk about finish climate, ice-fishing, and "where is Finland"
  • If you want to try Valamis without installing it yourself, just try it on their homepage: A demo environment is available
  • Picking up my favourite code demo, sevencogs, from my last-year's symposium presentation "Well Hidden Features"
  • The experience of publishing on Marketplace, PACL and PACL differences between application servers
  • Future Features and Release Plans (e.g. Tin Can API)
  • How to evolve from a Learning Management System to a Learning Portal
  • The principle of Aiming High
  • There's no shortage of standards to implement
  • The team is working with a school in Afghanistan to provide what might be the first e-learning system in an afghan school, also connecting them to finnish schools and students.
  • Upcoming Symposiums, Portal Solutions Forum, DevCon
  • Since we recorded, Valamis won the Liferay Marketplace App Contest

Follow Jari, Janne, RadioLiferay or me on twitter

Again, shoutout and big thank you to Auphonic for postproduction help. This is a fantastic service!

You'll find this episode - and make sure that you don't miss any of the future episodes - by subscribing to  http://feeds.feedburner.com/RadioLiferay. You can also subscribe on itunes.: Just search for "Radio Liferay" or just "Liferay" in the podcast directory.

download audio file

DevCon 2013 filling up quickly. Unconference Alert & Community Meeting Announcement

General Blogs 20 de septiembre de 2013 Por Olaf Kock Staff

You probably have heard about Liferay's DevCon that we'll have on 9.-10. October in Berlin. Here you'll have a lot of opportunities of learning about Liferay, get your opinion heard and give feedback about what you like or dislike in Liferay. Also, you'll be able to meet a lot of people behind the product. Today we're finalizing the agenda, and it will be public very soon.

If you've also heard about the optional Unconference on 8. October, please note that seats for this day are strictly limited and there are only a few left. If you enjoy this format (or want to experience it), make sure to register very soon or prepare for a seat on the waiting list. The unconference is fully booked, sorry, no more seats available!

And last but not least: A lot of you will be in Berlin on 8. October - as every year we're having a Community Meetup in the evening. This will take place in Ampelmann Restaurant in Stadtbahnbogen 159/160 (in Berlin-Mitte am Monbijoupark), 10178 Berlin-Mitte - easy to reach by local train to "Hackescher Markt". We will be there from 18:30-21:30. If you've seen us struggling with last year's success (we literally flooded the restaurant) you'll understand that our life will be a lot easier if you register in advance. Beer (or other beverages) will be available to those that register, so you can do yourself and us a favour and send your complete name, e-mail address, company, and job title to events-de@liferay.com, noting that you'll come to the Community Meeting (it's free, by the way).

With that, I hope to see a lot of you in Berlin, one or the other day.

Radio Liferay Episode 32: Jack Rider

General Blogs 7 de agosto de 2013 Por Olaf Kock Staff

 This week's guest is Jack Rider, from the mediterrean shore in Benidorm. He is a real Liferay veteran, having started with version 3.6, and has initiated quite a few very nice and well-usable projects.

Here are our topics:

  • Jack started in 2005 with Liferay 3.6, got first trained on Liferay 4.2 in 2007
  • He's working as a freelancer, specializing in Liferay, BPM and their integration
  • xmlportletfactory. This project generates simple CRUD portlets that make use of servicebuilder and many other aspects of the Liferay infrastructure. With many contributions from its community (e.g. Juan) more and more of the infrastructure is used: ServiceBuilder, Asset Framework, Workflow, IPC, Entity Relationships, Export to Excel, Activities,
  • xmlportletfactory is a one-time codegenerator: You generate once, then you can modify the resulting code.
  • The code is generated from templates - as it's open source (GPL3), of course you can change it.
  • Jack is also currently integrating BonitaBPM into Liferay. This replaces the Bonita Portal, you can interact with the Workflow engine from Liferay as well as from an  Android smartphone. This integration is expected to show up on the marketplace soon. It now has been published on marketplace.
  • As we speak about publication on the marketplace, let me insert a short&shameless pointer to my own fabulous podcasting app. It was not out when we recorded the podcast, but now it is.
  • bonitalife.org
  • Bonita being recognized by Gartner as the only open-source product that meets Gartner's definition of a BPMS.
  • Jack has another site, portlet.es - providing some sample portlets: A Sudoku generator (maybe it appears on marketplace soon), a Lexicon filter (e.g. for forums, blocking keywords), GroupNotification (find marketplace link) - (sends emails to all usergroups or site members)

Follow Jack, RadioLiferay or me on twitter

Again, shoutout and big thank you to Auphonic for postproduction help. This is a fantastic service!

You'll find this episode - and make sure that you don't miss any of the future episodes - by subscribing to  http://feeds.feedburner.com/RadioLiferay. You can also subscribe on itunes.: Just search for "Radio Liferay" or just "Liferay" in the podcast directory.

download audio file

Radio Liferay Episode 31: Neil Griffin

General Blogs 25 de julio de 2013 Por Olaf Kock Staff

 This week's guest is Neil Griffin, Liferay's resident JSF Wizard, Lead Engineer for Liferay Faces and representative for Liferay on the Portlet-Spec 3.0 group (JSR 362).

Here are our topics:

  • Liferay Faces started with portletfaces.org, a cooperative work by Triton and Mimacom. Neil started at Triton, then came to Liferay and Triton and Mimacom donated the code.
  • Liferay Faces (LF) consists of LF Bridge, LF Alloy, LF Portal, LF Util.
  • You can find a lot of Demos for integration with different components, LF Alloy, Icefaces, Primefaces, RichFaces, InterPortletCommunication. (find Demos)
  • The history and problems with earlier JSF versions (esp. Version 1) in Portlets: JSR-329 standardized a standard portlet bridge, those were typically built independently of the portals.
  • With JSF 2.0 the integration into portlets got easier and the problems vanished.
  • We have 20 Legends now - thanks for all the forum participation
  • How does a portlet bridge work and why do values end up in the session even though we've declared them to be request-scoped? E.g. what phases from the JSF lifecycle are bridged to what phases in Portlets?
  • With JSF 2.2 one can finally go stateless, previous versions have been strictly stateful.
  • AlloyUI 2.0 and its integration into Liferay Faces Alloy, a JSF implementation that utilizes AlloyUI and YUI components.
  • Liferay Faces 4.1/4.2 is targetting Java EE 7 (e.g. JSF 2.2) and 4.2 is planned to be released with Liferay 6.2.
  • Liferay Faces is distributed through Maven Central, thus it's ready for use and the release is technically independent of Liferay.
  • Liferay IDE already integrates JSF in the "New Portlet" Wizard, and it will become a lot better in the next versions
  • Neil's JSR involvement (JSR 314, JSF 2.0, JSR 344, JSR 2.2, JSR 362 Portlet 3.0)
  • Due to the involvement in the new portlet standard: What's the Portlet 3.0 committee working on?
  • CDI Context & Dependency Injection, Conversation Scope, liferay-cdi-portlet-bridge.jar, Implementations: JBoss Weld, Open WebBeans, Resin Candi
  • Shoutout to the various cooperators, e.g. from RedHat: Ken Finnegan, Stan Silvert, Pete Muir & Jozef Hartinger, from Oracle: Ed Burns, Mike Freedman, Roger Kitain, Manfred Riem, many Liferay Engineers
  • Neil will be at DevCon in Berlin and at other upcoming symposium(s?)

Follow Neil, RadioLiferay or me on twitter

Again, shoutout and big thank you to Auphonic for postproduction help. This is a fantastic service!

You'll find this episode - and make sure that you don't miss any of the future episodes - by subscribing to  http://feeds.feedburner.com/RadioLiferay. You can also subscribe on itunes.: Just search for "Radio Liferay" or just "Liferay" in the podcast directory.

download audio file

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