Combination View Flat View Tree View
Threads [ Previous | Next ]
Showing 21 - 25 of 25 results.
of 2
Drew Blessing
RE: Liferay For Dummies: Help new users get the most out of Liferay
January 8, 2012 3:04 PM
Answer

Drew Blessing

Rank: Junior Member

Posts: 79

Join Date: January 27, 2011

Recent Posts

Joss Sanglier:
Can I make a plea about the overuse of Videos?

In education, it is very well established and proven that video's and presentations are a very bad media for detailed education.

They are very good for giving overall ideas, or giving a sense of something, but when it comes down to step by step instruction, they are hopeless.

The written word, with huge attention given to layout, is a much better way of tutoring as it allows the learner to scan the knowledge, skip parts easily that they already know and go back and forwards over a specific topic if they are having trouble.

That does not mean that presentation systems do not have their place. If there was a section on Liferay Sites, then a video or presentation explaining the concept of the "site" in regards to the Liferay Portal is a really good idea. But the "how to create a site" should be a properly written tutorial that users of any skill level can use*.


Joss,

I don't completely agree with you but I have thought about this some. I would agree with a more hybrid approach. From experience I have found that my users really like having the video there to get them through the initial step. They can watch the presenter do it and get a sense for it. Then, they like to go back to the written material and follow those step by step to actually complete the process. So, I would be in favor of doing both videos and written documents. Together they are even more powerful.

Joss Sanglier:


The other problem about video tutorials is that because they are very easy to make, they are often absolutely terrible! They have not been properly scripted, are often not edited, have not had enough care to ensure that the video content is sharp and clearly readable and so on.



Liferay staff intend to edit all of the videos so they are well put together and look uniform. I also suspect that they will discard any horribly recorded videos either because the content is bad or the recording quality is bad. I won't argue that videos are often horrible, but I think we can really produce some useful, high-quality video.

Joss Sanglier:

*Note: Liferay should be far more successful and better known than it is - to be honest, it knocks systems like Drupal and Joomla into touch. But it has two barriers - firstly, as a Java based application it cannot be set up on your average shared server, not much we can do about that. Secondly, although getting it set up is fairly straightforward for non-programmers like me, and basic configuration is easy, the very fact that it is Java scares people away - they assume it will be incredibly complicated. The more the documentation can be used to demystify Liferay and show how accessible it really is, the better; writers should not be worried at being overly simplistic or teaching people to suck eggs!


Liferay is becoming more and more known everyday. The community is strong and the product speaks for itself. One of the great things about Liferay right now is that they are growing but not so fast that they forget where they came from or abandon all of those great things which us loyal users love about them. I would not like it if they just exploded and their offers changed paths drastically as sometimes happens.

The platform on which it is written may be a put off to some people but that is just the nature of any software. If it is on a platform you don't like you move on...I don't think there should be any question to that.

Thanks for your input, Joss. I'd love to hear what you think of the hybrid video/document idea.
Joss Sanglier
RE: Liferay For Dummies: Help new users get the most out of Liferay
January 12, 2012 8:46 AM
Answer

Joss Sanglier

Rank: Junior Member

Posts: 60

Join Date: July 15, 2009

Recent Posts

Hi Drew

The Hybrid idea is what I was sort of suggesting in the first paragraph you quoted.

A lot of this is simply about constructive layout - and here I am talking about on-line, or at least documentation that is read on a screen.

On a game I work on I have been looking at this carefully for some tutorials. My solution is hybrid, but also follows a rigid construction - All tutorials will have to follow exactly the same pattern. My aim was to give the reader a sense of being able to flip back ward and forward through the tutorials (or other educational documentation) in the same way as you would a book. (We can learn a lot from the printed form, it is a wonderfully intuitive GUI!)

My solution, for the moment, is using tabs. The first tab contains an overview, and that could be a video shot in such a way that you dont need to bring it to full screen to read it.

All the other tabs represent steps in the process. They can either be numbered or have useful titles - the choice is down to what makes most sense for the particular document.

I am restricting the number of tabs, however, probably to 15. I feel that is about a chapter's worth and more than enough to absorb in one session! It may prove a little too much. A very complicated subject (for instance, creating an application using Velocity in Liferay) may need to be broken up into several "chapters" each containing a set maximum of tabs.

For the game I am putting together a series of rules of how any tutorial is constructed. For instance: Short overview, What you will learn, what materials you will need, how long it will take, the actual stages, review, additional reading. And for those who know I happen to also be a cook, yet, it is very much like a recipe!

The advantage of doing this is that it forces the author to be concise and to really analyse the way they write the tutorial.

The end result should end up easy to use, allow the user to experiment while reading the tutorial, and make it very easy to navigate back and forth without waiting for page loading.

The problem for someone like me who is not a technical developer is that I can get easily lost if a term is used that I am unfamiliar with or if there are prerequisites that I am unaware of. By having a set template that all authors must use with a set of rules they must follow, the chance of that happening is much reduced.

It would also be an amazing work out of the Liferay WCM system! emoticon

Joss
Florencia Gadea
RE: Liferay For Dummies: Help new users get the most out of Liferay
September 27, 2012 9:44 AM
Answer

Florencia Gadea

Rank: Regular Member

Posts: 159

Join Date: March 27, 2012

Recent Posts

Hi James,

With Rotterdam Consulted Solutions we created these introductory videos to Liferay's architecture. Hope this helps!

Part I:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JBIA_GQGAGI

Part II:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0qNhph37-zs

Regards,

Flor.
Luis Mas
RE: Liferay For Dummies: Help new users get the most out of Liferay
December 1, 2012 8:32 AM
Answer

Luis Mas

Rank: Regular Member

Posts: 145

Join Date: May 18, 2009

Recent Posts

Just one more suggestion after attending coursera and codeschool lessons, videos should have subtitles for non English and a kind of test exams to be able to check if the student understood the class topics.
Hitoshi Ozawa
RE: Liferay For Dummies: Help new users get the most out of Liferay
December 2, 2012 1:58 AM
Answer

Hitoshi Ozawa

Rank: Liferay Legend

Posts: 7990

Join Date: March 23, 2010

Recent Posts

I think video was selected because there are many users who do not know too much English. Video showing steps to do something goes a lot further to these users than documents written in English.
Showing 21 - 25 of 25 results.
of 2